A previously unpublished chapter of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory—once “deemed too wild, subversive and insufficiently moral for the tender minds of British children”—is now available for your delectation. It features a jaunt into Wonka’s Vanilla Fudge Room, where many wonders and precariously situated heavy machinery await. (Not an OSHA-compliant workplace, that chocolate factory.)
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.
Illustration: Quentin Blake.

A previously unpublished chapter of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory—once “deemed too wild, subversive and insufficiently moral for the tender minds of British children”—is now available for your delectation. It features a jaunt into Wonka’s Vanilla Fudge Room, where many wonders and precariously situated heavy machinery await. (Not an OSHA-compliant workplace, that chocolate factory.)

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

Illustration: Quentin Blake.

“Late this morning, the pipes of my toilet began to make a noise that I can only describe as haunting. How to explain it? Loud, very loud. Sad, very sad. A sort of melancholy lowing, a primal moan expressing things seen and unseen. One could imagine ancient peoples hearing such things and looking to the supernatural for answers. If they had plumbing, I mean.”
Sadie Stein on Moby-Dick and the ungraspable phantom of life.

“Late this morning, the pipes of my toilet began to make a noise that I can only describe as haunting. How to explain it? Loud, very loud. Sad, very sad. A sort of melancholy lowing, a primal moan expressing things seen and unseen. One could imagine ancient peoples hearing such things and looking to the supernatural for answers. If they had plumbing, I mean.”

Sadie Stein on Moby-Dick and the ungraspable phantom of life.

Announcing our Fall issue, featuring interviews with Aharon Appelfeld, Herta Müller, and Chris Ware; an essay by David Searcy; fiction by David Gates, Atticus Lish, and Alejandro Zambra; the last installment of a novel by Rachel Cusk; poetry by Karen Solie, Ben Lerner, and Stephen Dunn; a portfolio of letters between George Plimpton and Terry Southern; and more!
Read selections from the issue here.

Announcing our Fall issue, featuring interviews with Aharon Appelfeld, Herta Müller, and Chris Ware; an essay by David Searcy; fiction by David Gates, Atticus Lish, and Alejandro Zambra; the last installment of a novel by Rachel Cusk; poetry by Karen Solie, Ben Lerner, and Stephen Dunn; a portfolio of letters between George Plimpton and Terry Southern; and more!

Read selections from the issue here.

What kind of worker is a writer? On Tillie Olsen, who wrote in dribs and drabs while holding down menial jobs and raising four children: “Writing, Olsen reminded her readers, takes time, education, energy, and resources, and these things are unevenly distributed. She encouraged us to attend to unorthodox writing produced in unfavorable circumstances—letters, diaries, scrapbooks like her own—and, in doing so, to question what counts as literature.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

What kind of worker is a writer? On Tillie Olsen, who wrote in dribs and drabs while holding down menial jobs and raising four children: “Writing, Olsen reminded her readers, takes time, education, energy, and resources, and these things are unevenly distributed. She encouraged us to attend to unorthodox writing produced in unfavorable circumstances—letters, diaries, scrapbooks like her own—and, in doing so, to question what counts as literature.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.