Norman Mailer’s outline for Harlot’s Ghost. As he states in his 2007 Art of Fiction interview, “Some say with bland certitude, Of course Mailer is a good nonfiction writer—he’s not much of a novelist. That irritates me, yes. Because the person saying that is just not familiar with my work. No one could read Harlot’s Ghost and say it’s nonfiction, you know. No one could read Ancient Evenings, for God’s sakes, and say that’s nonfiction. They’re not familiar with those works, that’s all. They’ve made up their minds on the basis of the stuff they have read, which tends to be the nonfictional work.”

Norman Mailer’s outline for Harlot’s Ghost. As he states in his 2007 Art of Fiction interview, “Some say with bland certitude, Of course Mailer is a good nonfiction writer—he’s not much of a novelist. That irritates me, yes. Because the person saying that is just not familiar with my work. No one could read Harlot’s Ghost and say it’s nonfiction, you know. No one could read Ancient Evenings, for God’s sakes, and say that’s nonfiction. They’re not familiar with those works, that’s all. They’ve made up their minds on the basis of the stuff they have read, which tends to be the nonfictional work.”

“For the sake of all those who love the jogo bonito, may the golden boot go to Messi. There’s only been one hat trick ever scored in a World Cup final, by England’s Geoff Hurst in 1966; if whoever referees the final can locate his whistle and his cards, we might yet see something extraordinary on July 13.”
Jonathan Wilson on the World Cup quarterfinal matches.

“For the sake of all those who love the jogo bonito, may the golden boot go to Messi. There’s only been one hat trick ever scored in a World Cup final, by England’s Geoff Hurst in 1966; if whoever referees the final can locate his whistle and his cards, we might yet see something extraordinary on July 13.”

Jonathan Wilson on the World Cup quarterfinal matches.

Searching for Orwell in Scotland: “I had come to Jura, a remote island on Scotland’s west coast, to find the solitude George Orwell had sought sixty-five years earlier to finish his classic, Nineteen Eighty-Four … [I] wanted to understand why a man so accustomed to city life had come to an inaccessible island of only 190 souls to find inspiration for a novel about totalitarianism in an urbanized state—why a writer at the peak of his celebrity ensconced himself in an austere farmhouse hidden in an inhospitable Scottish landscape.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

Searching for Orwell in Scotland: “I had come to Jura, a remote island on Scotland’s west coast, to find the solitude George Orwell had sought sixty-five years earlier to finish his classic, Nineteen Eighty-Four … [I] wanted to understand why a man so accustomed to city life had come to an inaccessible island of only 190 souls to find inspiration for a novel about totalitarianism in an urbanized state—why a writer at the peak of his celebrity ensconced himself in an austere farmhouse hidden in an inhospitable Scottish landscape.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.