Laura Ingalls Wilder collaborated with her daughter on many books in the Little House on the Prairie series, and it wasn’t always a cooperative arrangement. A letter from 1938 suggests the scope of their creative frictions: “Here you have a young girl,” Wilder’s daughter wrote to her about one character, “a girl twelve years old, who’s led a rather isolated life with father, mother, sisters in the country, and you can not have her suddenly acting like a slum child who has protected her virginity from street gangs since she was seven or eight.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

Laura Ingalls Wilder collaborated with her daughter on many books in the Little House on the Prairie series, and it wasn’t always a cooperative arrangement. A letter from 1938 suggests the scope of their creative frictions: “Here you have a young girl,” Wilder’s daughter wrote to her about one character, “a girl twelve years old, who’s led a rather isolated life with father, mother, sisters in the country, and you can not have her suddenly acting like a slum child who has protected her virginity from street gangs since she was seven or eight.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

Peripheral
Maybe it’s a bat’s wingsat the corner of your eye, rightwhere the eyeball swivelsinto its pocket. But whenthe brown of your eye turnswhere you thought the white saw,there’s only air & gold light,reality—as your mother defined it—(milk/no milk). Not for yearsdid you learn the word longing,and only then did you see the bat—just the fringe of its wingsbeating, its back in a heavyblack cloak.
—Toi Derricotte. Photography: Tamas Dezso.

Peripheral

Maybe it’s a bat’s wings
at the corner of your eye, right
where the eyeball swivels
into its pocket. But when
the brown of your eye turns
where you thought the white saw,
there’s only air & gold light,
reality—as your mother defined it—
(milk/no milk). Not for years
did you learn the word longing,
and only then did you see the bat—
just the fringe of its wings
beating, its back in a heavy
black cloak.

Toi Derricotte. Photography: Tamas Dezso.