Woolf v. Wharton: “Critics exalted Dalloway as an important advance in literature. In the Saturday Review, the critic Gerald Bullett unfavorably compared Wharton’s latest, A Mother’s Recompense, with Mrs. Dalloway, calling Woolf ‘a brilliant experimentalist,’ while Wharton was ‘content to practice the craft of fiction without attempting to enlarge its technical scope.’ ” Wharton was stung by the slight, and disapproved of modernist experimentalism—but it may have goaded her into attempting a “stunning narrative maneuver” in The Age of Innocence.
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

Woolf v. Wharton: “Critics exalted Dalloway as an important advance in literature. In the Saturday Review, the critic Gerald Bullett unfavorably compared Wharton’s latest, A Mother’s Recompense, with Mrs. Dalloway, calling Woolf ‘a brilliant experimentalist,’ while Wharton was ‘content to practice the craft of fiction without attempting to enlarge its technical scope.’ ” Wharton was stung by the slight, and disapproved of modernist experimentalism—but it may have goaded her into attempting a “stunning narrative maneuver” in The Age of Innocence.

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

“He played a vigorous game of softball but he was also something of a spoiled brat. His team had to win and it was well known that the pitcher should serve Frost a fat pitch. I remember him hitting a double. He fought hard for his team to win and he was willing to change the rules. He had to win at everything. Including poetry.”
Donald Hall on playing softball with Robert Frost.
“He played a vigorous game of softball but he was also something of a spoiled brat. His team had to win and it was well known that the pitcher should serve Frost a fat pitch. I remember him hitting a double. He fought hard for his team to win and he was willing to change the rules. He had to win at everything. Including poetry.”

Donald Hall on playing softball with Robert Frost.

“The graves registration people put him in a mattress cover Service Battery had used that morning to bring up bread in. It shocked us. I remember, but we found out later that was the standard way to do it: s.o.p., it was called, standard operating procedure. There were a lot of little trick names and initials for things those days.”
—Hughes Rudd, from “A Bankrupt.” Illustration: George Thompson.

“The graves registration people put him in a mattress cover Service Battery had used that morning to bring up bread in. It shocked us. I remember, but we found out later that was the standard way to do it: s.o.p., it was called, standard operating procedure. There were a lot of little trick names and initials for things those days.”

Hughes Rudd, from “A Bankrupt.” Illustration: George Thompson.