Robert Winthrop White, from “Four Studies for Sculpture.” Blair Fuller writes in his introduction, “No listing of his teachers or of artists he admires will provide much insight into the work of Robert Winthrop White. Rather than influences in concept, composition, or line his work reflects a neo-classic tradition upheld, and in part founded, by his grandfather, Stanford White, the architect, and his father, a Lawrence Grant White, architect and translator of Dante.”

Robert Winthrop White, from “Four Studies for Sculpture.” Blair Fuller writes in his introduction, “No listing of his teachers or of artists he admires will provide much insight into the work of Robert Winthrop White. Rather than influences in concept, composition, or line his work reflects a neo-classic tradition upheld, and in part founded, by his grandfather, Stanford White, the architect, and his father, a Lawrence Grant White, architect and translator of Dante.”

“For a long time, I would have said that in a way my desire was to create these moments that are heightened but temporal, like a performance you go to at Carnegie Hall where fifty years later you remember that one performance. They belong to a certain moment, and the trace is whatever memory you have of them. Now I’m actually thinking quite often about the afterlife of conversation, and maybe not just leaving them untouched but doing something with them. I don’t yet know quite what.”
Paul Holdengräber talks to Full Stop on the art of the interview.

“For a long time, I would have said that in a way my desire was to create these moments that are heightened but temporal, like a performance you go to at Carnegie Hall where fifty years later you remember that one performance. They belong to a certain moment, and the trace is whatever memory you have of them. Now I’m actually thinking quite often about the afterlife of conversation, and maybe not just leaving them untouched but doing something with them. I don’t yet know quite what.”

Paul Holdengräber talks to Full Stop on the art of the interview.

As a kind of language, emoji “are the social lubricant smoothing the rough edges of our digital lives: they underscore tone, introduce humor, and give us a quick way to bring personality into otherwise monochrome spaces.” But are they too conservative? “What habits of daily life do emoji promote, from the painted nails to the martini glasses? What behavior do they normalize? … In a broad sense, what emoji are trying to sell us, if not happiness, is a kind of quiescence … Emoji can represent cocktails, paparazzo attacks, and other trappings of Western consumer and celebrity culture with ease. More complicated matters? There’s no emoji for that.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

As a kind of language, emoji “are the social lubricant smoothing the rough edges of our digital lives: they underscore tone, introduce humor, and give us a quick way to bring personality into otherwise monochrome spaces.” But are they too conservative? “What habits of daily life do emoji promote, from the painted nails to the martini glasses? What behavior do they normalize? … In a broad sense, what emoji are trying to sell us, if not happiness, is a kind of quiescence … Emoji can represent cocktails, paparazzo attacks, and other trappings of Western consumer and celebrity culture with ease. More complicated matters? There’s no emoji for that.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.