“Did you know that in the thousand years or so between antiquity and the Renaissance there was no still life painting in the West? Can you imagine? Such a natural thing, you’d think. A thousand years. No pictures of nonsubservient things all by themselves. Through all that time such things are lost to us as self-sufficient facts.”
—David Searcy, from “Still Life Painting.”

“Did you know that in the thousand years or so between antiquity and the Renaissance there was no still life painting in the West? Can you imagine? Such a natural thing, you’d think. A thousand years. No pictures of nonsubservient things all by themselves. Through all that time such things are lost to us as self-sufficient facts.”

David Searcy, from “Still Life Painting.”

“Marie d’Agoult (1805-1876) wrote novels as Daniel Stern. On her tomb, a small head of Goethe, one of her lovers, hovers in the background with a worried expression. Her best-known liaison, however, was with Franz Liszt. One of their three children, Cosima, married composer Richard Wagner.” From Judi Culbertson and Tom Randall’s feature “Permanent Parisians.”

“Marie d’Agoult (1805-1876) wrote novels as Daniel Stern. On her tomb, a small head of Goethe, one of her lovers, hovers in the background with a worried expression. Her best-known liaison, however, was with Franz Liszt. One of their three children, Cosima, married composer Richard Wagner.” From Judi Culbertson and Tom Randall’s feature “Permanent Parisians.”

James Boswell had more hobbies than just following around Samuel Johnson; he was also “an inveterate execution goer in an age when such activity was considered prurient for a gentleman … Boswell diligently noted the names and crimes of the condemned: robbery, theft, escaping a prison hulk, forgery and murder. He describes a brother and sister convicted of burglary who met their deaths holding hands, only to be separated when they were cut down from the gallows.” He attended at least twenty-one executions, though they gave him nightmares and depressed him. The best hobbies (e.g., writing) often do.
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

James Boswell had more hobbies than just following around Samuel Johnson; he was also “an inveterate execution goer in an age when such activity was considered prurient for a gentleman … Boswell diligently noted the names and crimes of the condemned: robbery, theft, escaping a prison hulk, forgery and murder. He describes a brother and sister convicted of burglary who met their deaths holding hands, only to be separated when they were cut down from the gallows.” He attended at least twenty-one executions, though they gave him nightmares and depressed him. The best hobbies (e.g., writing) often do.

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.