“‘I used to want to live / to avoid your elegy,’ Robert Lowell confessed in ‘For John Berryman.’
“The death of one poet is an extraordinary occasion for another poet. It is like the day a stonemason dies and another has to carve his headstone. Like a rough ashlar, the elegy sits waiting to be shaped into a memorial for the one who is gone. The death of a poet so great as Jack Gilbert last week pains, but also promises remembrances fitting the one who died.”
Read more of Casey N. Cep on poets mourning poets here.

“‘I used to want to live / to avoid your elegy,’ Robert Lowell confessed in ‘For John Berryman.’

“The death of one poet is an extraordinary occasion for another poet. It is like the day a stonemason dies and another has to carve his headstone. Like a rough ashlar, the elegy sits waiting to be shaped into a memorial for the one who is gone. The death of a poet so great as Jack Gilbert last week pains, but also promises remembrances fitting the one who died.”

Read more of Casey N. Cep on poets mourning poets here.

  1. thepoetrybook reblogged this from theparisreview
  2. theredshoes reblogged this from theparisreview and added:
    ….well, this would be great if it weren’t about Jack Gilbert.
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  7. rabbitring reblogged this from theparisreview and added:
    Lament often inaugurates elegies, but repetition organizes them. Take Elizabeth Bishop’s “North Haven,” written for...
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