“If you’re going to judge a book by its endpapers, then I recommend Julie Morstad’s The Wayside. I’ve spent a fair amount of time imagining them on the walls of the drawing room I don’t have. It helps that the rest of the book—all new drawings by the Canadian illustrator—is equal parts charming and strange. There’s definitely an Edward Gorey–esque feel to her work, but I also see occasional hints of William Péne du Bois (in a troupe of women acrobats) and Amy Cutler (in the wonderful patterned textiles). I think my favorite drawing may be a double gatefold depicting groups of flatly rendered performing-arts kids doing their thing. It’s Attic form meets Fame.” —Nicole Rudick
For more of this week’s staff picks, including G. V. Desani’s All About H. Hatterr, Andrés Neuman’s Traveler of the Century, and Wendy Gimbel’s Havana Dreams, click here.

“If you’re going to judge a book by its endpapers, then I recommend Julie Morstad’s The Wayside. I’ve spent a fair amount of time imagining them on the walls of the drawing room I don’t have. It helps that the rest of the book—all new drawings by the Canadian illustrator—is equal parts charming and strange. There’s definitely an Edward Gorey–esque feel to her work, but I also see occasional hints of William Péne du Bois (in a troupe of women acrobats) and Amy Cutler (in the wonderful patterned textiles). I think my favorite drawing may be a double gatefold depicting groups of flatly rendered performing-arts kids doing their thing. It’s Attic form meets Fame.” —Nicole Rudick

For more of this week’s staff picks, including G. V. Desani’s All About H. Hatterr, Andrés Neuman’s Traveler of the Century, and Wendy Gimbel’s Havana Dreams, click here.

  1. madame-schrodinger reblogged this from theparisreview
  2. whoneedstransitions reblogged this from theparisreview and added:
    Must remember this for my little sister.
  3. sheandartjournal reblogged this from theparisreview
  4. cometinorbit38 reblogged this from theparisreview
  5. theparisreview posted this