“I like to see a writer stretch to represent a consciousness as big, as clued-in, as grownup as the reader’s own mind. What’s called dramatic irony—where the writer and reader sort of conspire together over the narrator’s head—doesn’t interest me. Except every once in a while, when it does.”Editor Lorin Stein on Emma Cline’s short story “Marion,” from our Summer 2013 issue. Listen to Cline read her story here.

“I like to see a writer stretch to represent a consciousness as big, as clued-in, as grownup as the reader’s own mind. What’s called dramatic irony—where the writer and reader sort of conspire together over the narrator’s head—doesn’t interest me. Except every once in a while, when it does.”

Editor Lorin Stein on Emma Cline’s short story “Marion,” from our Summer 2013 issue. Listen to Cline read her story here.

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