“I, too, often make moral arguments about art, but on my better days I’m suspicious of them, because I’m aware of the envy, the powerlessness and self-pity, that lurks behind them.”
From our Fall issue, Jonathan Franzen on John Updike, Philip Roth, and Krausian moralism.

“I, too, often make moral arguments about art, but on my better days I’m suspicious of them, because I’m aware of the envy, the powerlessness and self-pity, that lurks behind them.”

From our Fall issue, Jonathan Franzen on John Updike, Philip Roth, and Krausian moralism.

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